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“Utterly unforgettable” – Publishers Weekly’s review

Believe it or not, I drafted the present post nearly 4 years ago… time has flown since then but “The Aviator’s Wife” is definitely “utterly unforgettable”. 

– Let me share this book with you –

The amazing novelist Melanie Benjamin raises the curtain on one of these American couple whose names are known worldwide:

  • Anne Morrow-Lindberg, writer, aviator and author of the inspirational book “Gift from the Sea” in which she shares, in a subtle way,  love, marriage, solitude, age, youth…
  • Charles Lindberg, author, military officer and aviator, remembered for flying alone from Long Island, New York to Paris, France on a single-seat and single-engine monoplane in 1927, “The Spirit of St. Louis”…

Anne Morrow, daughter of an U.S. ambassador to Mexico, being introspective, leads her life in the shadows of  her own family and is very often overshadowed by her older sister. Very young, Ann would love to express her literary aspirations but, she hides them. For Christmas, she travels from her college to Mexico City. There she meets, Charles Lindberg enhanced by his prestige and fame solo flight across the Atlantic. Being shy and modest, she bets that the young man hardly noticed her. But this is absolutely not the case.

Charles finds in Ann shared points of interests, the same adventurous spirit, in a word they are complementary. Their wedding in 1929 is one of the biggest event of the year. Some years after, Ann becomes the first U.S. woman licensed as a pilot. But as in her early life, Ann is once more overshadowed now, by her husband. For many people, even in her own family, she is viewed as the aviator’s wife.

Her marriage, her life, specially after the kidnapping and the murder of her son, has no common point with the idealistic view she had during the very first years of her wedding.  She leads a very complicated life which is enthralled and imprisoned being married to Charles Lindbergh. sufferings, heartbreaking moments, lows and highs. Ann finally find a way to embrace what life offers, change and happiness.

In her author’s note, Melanie Benjamin (pseudonym for Melanie Hauser) says: “As a historical novelist, the most gratifying thing I hear is that the reader was inspired, after reading my work of fiction, to research these remarkable people’s lives further. That is what historical fiction does best, I think; it leaves the reader with a desire to know more. I hope my novel accomplishes this.”

With this reader, you indeed accomplished your target, Melanie Benjamin. My interest has been accelerated to know and learn more about Ann Morrow Lindberg. Your book is a historical fiction but there’s so much insight to gain from reading “The Aviator’s Wife”…

“One cannot collect all the beautiful shells on the beach. One can collect only a few, and they are more beautiful if they are few.

– Anne Morrow Lindbergh